Monthly Archives: January 2020

10 Tips for Leadership When You’re Not the Boss

One does not necessarily need a fancy position or title in order to be a leader. One way to be a leader is to make sure that you get your ideas across in an unambiguous and firm manner. Another way to be a leader is to learn how to be accommodating and flexible with various viewpoints and procedures. One should also take care to advocate for oneself in a confident but polite manner (not in a rude or mean way, but not in a passive or wimpy way).

Key Takeaways:

  • Effective leaders are transparent in communication. They say what they mean, and leave ambiguity behind. Their directness leave their intent clear and easy to understand.
  • A good leader is flexible, and listens to other people’s ideas. They are open to new and creative approaches to problems.
  • A effective leader stands up for themselves. They are firm without being rude, but stand their ground. They are not pushed around by the whims of lazy or manipulative employees.

“Leaders don’t grumble behind closed doors when things don’t go their way.”

Read more: http://www.evilhrlady.org/2019/09/10-tips-for-leadership-when-youre-not-the-boss.html

Celebrate Your Successes Through Micro Victories

Small activities can lead to big change, but people seldom congratulate themselves on smaller accomplishments, or “micro-victories” as they’ve been called. On both personal and team levels, it’s important to celebrate small successes along the pathway toward major goals. On an organizational level, companies often pursue “big, hairy, audacious goals” that could take years to achieve. Along the way, they should provide regular status reports to employees and celebrate micro-victories. It’s equally important to keep people abreast of any adjustments to the big plan, lest employees perceive changes as signs of failure. Ultimately, celebrating small successes is a great motivator en route to accomplishing larger goals.

Key Takeaways:

  • Small achievements along the path to larger victories are important. Recognizing the small goals’ importance, celebrating them, can improve success at larger tasks.
  • On an individual level, we can privately celebrate the steps we take towards a final goal. Recognizing our success at the small things will give us a great mindset to achieve larger victories.
  • Recognizing team achievements is great for improving morale. Even the small victories being acknowledged and praised can motivate and inspire our teams to do better at larger tasks with positivity.

“When we set goals for ourselves, we need to think about celebrating our success.”

Read more: https://www.hrbartender.com/2019/employee-engagement/celebrate-successes-micro-victories/

5 Things on Your Resume You May Want to Reconsider

While you may be spending quite a bit of time perfecting your resume, it’s only looked at for less than a minutes by most hiring professionals. Some companies even have a software program that weeds out certain candidates based on some key phrases that the employee may not be looking for. Try to leave out hobbies, and the full address on the resume, it’s not really necessary anymore, or maybe never was. You don’t need to list all of the previous employers, just the relevant ones and use a clean and legible font. There is a lot of competition out there and it’s best to stand out as well as you can.

Key Takeaways:

  • There are many things that can be safely left off a resume. Sometimes, including these items can actually hurt your chances. Knowing what to keep, and what to skip, is key.
  • Style and font is important. Applying for a serious job, with an informal tone and Comic Sans can definitely harm a candidate.
  • Unless hobbies, work history, and pay are relevant to the specific position, they are best left off. Keep the resume clear and concise!

“Approximately 40% of all hiring managers say they spend less than a minute looking at a candidate’s resume.”

Read more: https://workology.com/5-things-on-your-resume-you-may-want-to-reconsider/

3 Ways to Prioritize Compliance in Your Modern Dental Practice

Maintaining compliance is becoming more and more critical as private practices continue to grow and diversify, and there are three key ideas to implement. First, one should designate particular employees or associates to deal with different areas of compliance, such as HIPAA or labor laws. Second, one should use the latest digital resources and software, such as AutoSDS and DDS Rescue, to better assist compliance officers. Third, one should pay attention to an often neglected but still important area of patient compliance.

Key Takeaways:

  • There is a variety of compliance software programs that can assist your compliance officer.
  • No matter how much software and other compliance tools may cost, they can prevent the dental practice from being liable for noncompliance.
  • Be sure that the patient really understand the treatment they are about to receive and can therefore give their consent.

“In a smaller practice, for OSHA and HIPAA, the same person can be assigned to the compliance role.”

Read more: https://www.offthecusp.com/3-ways-to-prioritize-compliance-in-your-modern-dental-practice/

Overcoming Overwhelm In The Dental Office – Take Your Dental Practice To the Next Level with Dental Practice Solutions! – Hygienetown

Dental professionals often feel overwhelmed with all they have to do. More patients, more insurance claims and more calculus to scale can seem stressful, but it also means more work and more money. Remind yourself that more is good. To maintain positive thoughts, spend a few minutes each day listing three things for which you are grateful. They can even be silly things. Every 90 days, make a list of your recent accomplishments. Also, do volunteer work. This seems counter-intuitive if you’re busy, but it reminds you of how good you have it compared to some other people. A positive attitude goes a long way to overcoming overwhelm.

Key Takeaways:

  • Focusing on being more efficient, and doing more with what time we have, is useful in overcoming feelings of being overwhelmed.
  • The emails, calls, voicemails, the full schedule means that we are employed and have a productive job. Take some time to be grateful for our job we have!
  • Acknowledgement of small gains over time is important. One trick is think about how we were three months ago, and focus on how much better we are now.

“Each day take just three to five minutes and write three things that you are grateful for.”

Read more: https://www.hygienetown.com/blog/post/12169/overcoming-overwhelm-in-the-dental-office