Monthly Archives: September 2016

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Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement: Career Development

Editor’s note: In a previous post, I introduced you to the Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey, which is conducted annually by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). The survey is used as a tool to identify factors that influence overall employee satisfaction and engagement in the workplace, and it’s results provide insight to employee preferences and highlight key areas for businesses to consider as they develop and enhance initiatives for organizational improvement. The survey assesses 43 aspects of satisfaction and 37 aspects of engagement that are both categorized into eight areas, and I am dedicating a blog entry to each area. For this blog, we are focusing on the area of Career Development.

Career Development–in my opinion–is huge, especially in the dental field. Because the industry is constantly changing with the development of new technology and products, it’s a great idea to offer training and access to professional development courses in order to keep your dental practice hip and up-do-date as far as methods and technology goes. According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) mployee Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey report, “Informal and formal learning experiences can provide employees with a more comprehensive skill set and reassurance that their employer recognizes their value. Presented with new knowledge and abilities, employees will be better prepared to handle new technologies and innovations and may be able to contribute to enhancing their organization’s systems and procedures.”

More than one-half of those polled for this survey–an amount of 55 percent–reported that opportunities they get to use their skills and abilities at work is a very important contributor to job satisfaction. “Research indicates that HR professionals are worried about the potential mismatch between the skills required to be successful in a role and the skills that job candidates actually possess,” cites the report. “In research addressing the human capital challenges in the coming decade, SHRM found that the leading concerns among HR professionals were developing the next generation of organizational leaders (39%) and managing the loss of key workers and their skill sets due to retirement (35%). Given the anticipated skills gap, career and professional development is particularly important to employees and employers alike.” Therefore, it is beneficial to consider paying for job-specific training opportunities for your employees.

“Job-specific training can help employees develop their talents, empowering them to become more effective and engaged in their roles,” reads the report. “Employees’ expanded knowledge could lead to enhanced organizational processes and increased productivity. Forty-two percent of employees viewed job-specific training as very important to their job satisfaction. Three-fifths (62%) of employees indicated they were satisfied with job-specific training at their organization. Female and Millennial employees reported job-specific training to be more important to their job satisfaction than did male and Baby Boomer employees, respectively.”

When thinking about professional development, it is important to consider your employees’ ages. As noted in the above paragraph, those of younger generations are much more apt to want to continue to expand their knowledge base throughout their lifetime. According to the survey, the number of employees that rank career advancement opportunities as very important to their job satisfaction has risen by almost 20 percentage points in the last eight years, which means that providing professional development and hiring from within can contribute to employee retention as well.

So how does your bottom line contribute to this aspect of employee satisfaction? According to the findings, “35 percent of employees felt that paid training was very important to employee job satisfaction, and 61 percent said they were satisfied with this aspect, an increase of 17 percentage points from 2013. The rise in satisfaction may be a result of organizations returning training to their lists of offered benefits after a period of shrinking budgets during the Great Recession or a tool to retain or recruit talented workers.” My office sets aside a specific amount for each department’s professional development every year when budget planning rolls around. Higher education is also a field that is ever-changing, and my employer realizes that we have to be on the ball when it comes to keeping up.

So what opportunities to you have for continuing education in the dental field? The American Dental Association is a good place to start. According to the ADA’s website, the association provides members with continuing education tailored to their specific needs. “From the day you graduate dental school until the time you sell your practice, we’ll provide cutting-edge, unique education that has an immediate impact on your ability to treat patients, grow your practice and meet state licensure requirements.” The ADA offers online and in-person classes to meet the time scheduling needs of all members. Check out all of the options ADA has to offer, and be sure to check back next time for the next blog of the series: Compensation and Benefits.

The ins and outs of moving a dental career

If you are a dentist and you want to relocate, fret not as it isn’t as difficult as it might seem. The most difficult part of this experience will be finding which states will accept your board exam and your credentials. This is made difficult because of the large amount of information there is to look over, regarding each state’s requirements. From there, though, it gets much easier. The organization in the dental industry allows for a relatively smooth transition and you’ll likely be helped along by your state’s dental association.

Continue reading

Do’s and don’ts of social media

Social media is an effective way for dentists to attract new patients. Here are some dos and donts for dental offices:

Do
Base your social media strategy on the type of patient you want to attract.
Make sure your content reflects your values.
Welcome feedback from patients.
Stay professional-but relatable.
Let your team’s personality shine.

Don’ts
Never post trademarked content without attribution.
Never post individual information without written consent.
Avoid unpleasant pictures of treatment.
Stay away from political or religious content.
Don’t respond aggressively to negative online reviews.

Read the full article here: http://newdentistblog.ada.org/wordpress/dos-and-donts-of-social-media/

Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey: Compensation and Benefits

Editor’s note: In a previous post, I introduced you to the Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey, which is conducted annually by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). The survey is used as a tool to identify factors that influence overall employee satisfaction and engagement in the workplace, and it’s results provide insight to employee preferences and highlight key areas for businesses to consider as they develop and enhance initiatives for organizational improvement. The survey assesses 43 aspects of satisfaction and 37 aspects of engagement that are both categorized into eight areas, and I am dedicating a blog entry to each area. For this blog, we are focusing on the area of Compensation and Benefits.

The subject of compensation and benefits has been a kind of tricky one to discuss during the last decade with things like the Great Recession and the Affordable Car Act coming into play. But as the economy has continued to improve over the last several years, employee satisfaction in this area has improved too.

According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey, because the economy is now doing better, employees are leaving current jobs and actively seeking out new ones that offer better compensation and full benefits. “With the introduction of new interpersonal job satisfaction contributors to last year’s Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, the data revealed that culture and relationships are just as important as financial components that come with a job,” reads the report.

I couldn’t agree more.

Obviously compensation is a major contributing factor to satisfaction. That’s a given. The main reason people work is to make money, and because of that, I would like to focus on the benefits aspect of this area.

According to the survey results, benefits have been among the top five contributors of job satisfaction since 2002, with the exception of 2012 when it was rated sixth for some reason. “Even more noteworthy, benefits were among the top two contributors from 2002 to 2010. In 2015, 60 percent of employees rated benefits as a very important contributor to job satisfaction, keeping benefits at the number three position,” the survey report reads. “As the economy continues to improve and job seekers become more confident in securing new positions, organizations must design competitive benefits packages to attract and retain top talent. Just over two-thirds (68 percent) of employees indicated that they were satisfied with their benefits.”

These benefits include :

  1. Paid time off
  2. Health care/ medical benefits
  3. Flexibility to balance life and work issues
  4. Defined contribution plans (e.g. 401(k), 403(b))
  5. Family-friendly benefits
  6. Defined benefit pension plans
  7. Wellness programs

There study found that the most common health care plan offered was a preferred provider organization (PPO), at 85 percent, and 43 percent of organizations offered health savings accounts, which first became popular in 2011. As the cost of health care continues to climb, organizations may shift to different types of health care to offset the expenses. “Given the rising health care costs and heightened awareness of financial and retirement preparedness, it is expected that benefits will likely play a much larger role in the near future,” the report reads. “The SHRM Strategic Benefits Survey Series found that although not particularly common, more organizations have leveraged their benefits packages to recruit or retain employees in 2015 (38 percent and 33percent, respectively) compared with 2013 and 2012.”

Here’s the thing: medical benefits are so important. I basically chose my job because of the healthcare package and time off it offered. I am a 29-year-old woman who has her fair share of medical issues that need to be addressed multiple times a year and require daily prescriptions. The time off and healthcare plan are essential to my wellbeing. Not to mention, my husband and I will be having children eventually which we will do with the help of healthcare and time off. Not to mention, it is necessary for everyone to have an adequate amount of time away from their job to recharge their batteries. Vacation time is so important.

If you are a dental practice in need of a new health insurance plan for your employees, check out the link below. After some searching I found a Zane Benefits article that includes four tips to finding the right medical insurance specifically for dental practices.

 

The 2016 Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey results

Every year the Society of Human Resource Management produces original research on emerging workplace issues and their implications for the HR professional and business owners. The information gained from these unique surveys helps every business that employs workers, from Fortune 500 company to the dental office with a three-person staff and everyone in between. One of the most important is the Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey. According to the SHRM website, the purpose of this annual survey is to identify factors that influence overall employee satisfaction and engagement in the workplace. This information will provide insight on employee preferences and highlight key areas for organizations to consider as they develop and enhance initiatives for organizational improvement. The findings in the report came from 600 United States Workers who took the survey during the months of November and December 2015.

The survey assessed 43 aspects of employee job satisfaction and 37 aspects of employee engagement. Each year the aspects, which are categorized into eight areas, are examined and modified if necessary, and they include: career development, compensation, benefits, employee relationships with management, work environment, conditions for engagement, engagement opinions and engagement behaviors.

This blog will be the first of a series using this survey’s information, as there are so many things to talk about and not enough space in one blog. I will go over each area listed above in subsequent blogs-and I’ll even throw a blog in there about Millennials–but first thing’s first. Let’s talk about overall satisfaction.

Are we satisfied?

According to the report, 2015 presents the greatest proportion of employees satisfied with their current job since SHRM first administered this survey in 2002. In 2015, 88 percent of U.S. employees reported they were satisfied with their job overall, with 37 percent reporting they were very satisfied and 51 percent reporting they were somewhat satisfied. These numbers mark the highest level of satisfaction in the last 10 years. Similar percentages were found when asked about satisfaction toward employers with 45 percent indicating somewhat satisfaction and 40% indicating extreme satisfaction with their organization. Ten years earlier, in 2005, employee satisfaction was at 77 percent, and the high within the last ten years before 2015 was tied at 86 percent in both 2009 and 2014.

So why is this? “Not surprisingly since the economy has remained relatively stable over the last couple of years, organizations may have found themselves being able to reintroduce incentives and perks that had been reduced or eliminated as a result of the Great Recession,” reads the report. And because the Great Recession is over, employers are able to fill they were forced to eliminate to save money, which is giving employees more flexibility to seek out opportunities that best fit their needs and wants rather than remain in a position for job security. When employees are able to meet their needs and wants, they are more satisfied and more likely to not look for another job elsewhere.

In the coming blogs, we will dive into this survey, and I will give you a glimpse into what employees are really looking for in a job, what is making them satisfied and what they still need from their employer. Stay tuned!