Monthly Archives: August 2016

When an Employee Un-Quits and Other Important HR-Centric Situations

Picture it: Rachel, your front desk manager, schedules a meeting, airs her grievances, tells you why she can no longer be a part of your practice and gives her two weeks. As soon as she leaves your office, you put the wheels in motion to replace her. You post the position opening on job boards, LinkedIn and staffing firm websites, and start to go through the applications that come in, deciding who would be a good fit to replace Rachel. But then, a week later: JUST KIDDING! Rachel decides to rescind her two-weeks notice and asks you to just forget about all of those awful things she said. She just had a bad day. “I mean, you know how that goes right?” she says with a hint of embarrassed laughter.

Rachel un-quit. While it seems like this shouldn’t happen that often, it does. So now what do you do? On one hand, Rachel is such an asset to your practice, but on the other, who wants to keep an employee that clearly doesn’t want to be a part of your business. While the final decision is totally up to you, keep in mind that you are not obligated to keep employees who rescind their two-week notice. According to Rebecca Boartfield and Tim Twigg, there is nothing, by law, requiring you to accept the rescinding of a two-week notice. In Boartfield and Twigg’s article “Human Resource Questions for Dentists: Employee rescinds resignation; CE reimbursement” written for DentistryIQ.com, they give you some legal tips to consider when dealing with this situation. “You may continue with ending her employment if you so choose,” they write. “However, you should do so with caution due to a recent ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. On November 17, 2015, this court held that an employer’s rejection of an employee’s rescission of resignation can ‘sometimes constitute an adverse employment action’ and may be considered retaliation under Title VII.”

In this case cited above, the plaintiff submitted her resignation and then testified at a grievance hearing that her supervisor had sexually harassed her. After the hearing, the plaintiff rescinded her resignation, but her her supervisor–who she just accused of harassment–denied the rescinding.  “As a result, the decision to refuse to rescind a job resignation may be challenged and a court could analyze the context of the rejection of the rescission to determine whether it is considered an adverse employment action,” write Boartfield and Twigg.

Because each case is different, managers and business owners must treat every one as such in order to determine the best outcome for both your practice and your employee. Keep in mind the legality of the situation and what, if any, damage has already been done. I’m sure if Rachel would have been leaving on good terms, her manager would probably be leaning more toward accepting the rescinding of her two-week notice. In the same vein, it’s important that Rachel, and all of you out there who are thinking about leaving your job, quit with tact and grace . . . just in case you might want to un-quit before your two weeks are up. And, also because it’s really never good to completely burn a bridge. You never know when you’ll need that employer as a reference, even if it doesn’t seem like it now.

To read more about this issue and CE reimbursement for non-mandatory technology training, check out the the full article by Boartfield and Twigg .

Finding a job in federal dentistry

Finding a job is a difficult task. Finding the right job sometimes seems impossible. Finding a job in a specific field in a specific sector, there you need help. For people looking for a job in the dentistry in the federal sector, The American Dental Association has helped by setting a road map for those looking. They have done the research and laid out a general view of some benefits and have provided links to some prospective areas to find that job.

Finding a job in federal dentistry

5 Flexible Work Strategies – and The Companies Thriving With Them

We are all looking to make our work life a little easier- or at least day to day more smooth… Thankfully there is a simple strategy that works for nearly every employee. This is a look at five flexible work strategies along with examples of the companies that implement them such as big name companies Netflix and LinkedIn.

5 Flexible Work Strategies – and The Companies Thriving With Them

Hiring the Right People, The Struggle is Real

As a dental office manager or owner, your top two priorities are to seek out customers and hire the right people. Day in and day out you work hard to balance the priorities between these two tasks. At Dental Temps Professional Services, we often hear from our customers about their constant struggle of time dedication, and how hiring the right people is the bigger challenge–the one that often dominates their time for weeks on end. Not only hiring employees all-consuming, it also greatly affects your operation’s bottom line.

Often we find a structure in place for evaluating employee success and performance, but there is no plan for the hiring process. After working closely in evaluating our customers’ needs and learning about their hiring processes, here’s what we know: Every dentistry is different. Some offices have a two- or three-tier interview process, while others relied on their instincts alone. Some have a detailed step-by- step criteria of candidate qualities, and others had none. Some hire in anticipation of a spot becoming available, and others are simply reactionary in their process with a knee-jerk reaction, hiring sight unseen. I’m always amazed when I hear from a job seeker who accepted a job offer without meeting the employer or visiting the office to get a feel for the culture. That is a set-up for failure for both the employer and the employee.Today, I challenge you to put pen to paper and write a plan to increase the probability of success in your hiring process. Let’s get started.

Today, I challenge you to put pen to paper and write a plan to increase the probability of success in your hiring process. Let’s get started.Begin with writing a step-by-step plan, one you will use each time you are looking to make a hire. This list would include when to hire. Hiring at the 12th hour generally results in poor hires. Having a plan and beginning the hiring process early is the key to a successful hire. Secondly, know how you are going to find the right candidates. Begin with your employees. Often times, employee referrals are excellent, as both parties want the association to be positive.

Begin with writing a step-by-step plan, one you will use each time you are looking to make a hire. This list would include when to hire. Hiring at the 12th hour generally results in poor hires. Having a plan and beginning the hiring process early is the key to a successful hire. Secondly, know how you are going to find the right candidates. Begin with your employees. Often times, employee referrals are excellent, as both parties want the association to be positive.

Both the culture of your business and your employee requirements are critical points to take note of. Before you bring a new hire on board, have your values, work ethic, curiosity and generosity written on paper. Some of the requirements could include skill level, ability to learn, ability to adapt and level of initiative.

Have steps in place to measure success. How will you measure job effectiveness? Not only for new hires, but also for existing employees. Everyone should be treated the same way across the board. Have a training plan in place. Communicate with the new hire weekly on their progress. Don’t let 90 days go by without a word to them on their performance. You should make every effort to help your new employee be a success. Have a buddy system in place where there is a mentor for each new hire. Hiring is a team effort. Every employee should be involved in the process.

With a hiring plan in place, you won’t have the stress and struggle you’re experiencing today. Take the time and effort to write your plan and share it with your team at a staff meeting. Start today. If you make the crooked places straight in your hiring process, it will lead you straight to hiring success with less stress!

Do You Know What’s in Your Website? Are You Sure?

It is easy to just hire someone to create you the eye catching website you have dreamed of, but how often do we really review what is on our dental practice’s? Learn more about the importance of creating original content for your website, after all it is often the first your new guest’s see of your practice!

Key Takeaways:

  • Original content is important
  • Third-party web developers could be hiding unapproved links or items in your webpage
  • Either create your own blog or risk other people’s ulterior motives in creating one for you.

“The reality is that most dental websites are chock-full of canned content provided by the website developer.”

http://thedentalwarrior.com/2016/07/03/do-you-know-whats-in-your-website-are-you-sure/