Monthly Archives: April 2016

What Is Employee Onboarding and Why Does It Matter?

Onboarding is a strategic initiative that starts the moment you make your employee selection (hire an employee) and ends when the employee has already been working in your organization for some time, typically after 30-90 days.

The onboarding process includes:

  • Pre-hire paperwork, if required
  • New hire paperwork (W-4, I-9, Non-competes, Non-Disclosures, Policies, etc.)
  • Orientation (Orienting the employee to the lay of the land)
  • Goal and expectation setting
  • Individual development planning
  • Safety & compliance procedural training
  • Training (functional and professional training)
  • Job-shadowing roles different from theirs
  • Coaching and/or Mentoring
  • Check-ins (scheduled in advance)

Why is onboarding so important?

Onboarding connects the new employee to the organization they have just joined and enables them to engage with their new office, team, and customers. Onboarding acclimates the new employees to the culture of the organization.

Most organizations, large and small, want engaged employees. Engaged employees are more loyal to the employer and their customers, and they are typically happier employees – happy employees typically stick around, especially in roles where demand is high, thus reducing turnover.

Employees start a new job typically because there is a promise of something they need or want. Some people leave other jobs/take new jobs for more money but many leave jobs or take new jobs for the promise of growth, future development opportunities, better manager/leaders or the promise of a better working culture & environment. A good onboarding program allows an organization to make a good first impression and is a tool to initiate long-term employee success.

What are the dangers of no onboarding plan or process?

The dangers of not having an onboarding process are many can result in high costs. You’ll run the risk of being out of compliance, using unsafe techniques and practices, having dissatisfied customers, not connecting the new hire to the necessary culture needed for success and so on. Onboarding allows you to reduce turnover costs and maximize your hiring efforts.

Make onboarding a priority; create an onboarding plan that can be replicated for new hires and adjusted for employees in different roles.

What does an onboarding plan look like?

An example: Let’s say that Bobby is hired as an experienced dental assistant.

Before Day 1: 

Bobby is welcomed with a welcome call; Manager/Owner inquires about questions Bobby may have
Paperwork is sent to Bobby to read & complete in advance

Day 1:

Bobby brings completed paperwork with him

Bobby attends a 2-hour orientation including a review of handbook, tour of the office space, introductions to the team and general advice

Bobby spends time shadowing someone who is in a dental assistant role similar to the position Bobby will hold

Bobby participates in safety training overview, going forward safety procedure training will be included in each upcoming training/shadowing session

Bobby and his manager meet in the afternoon to discuss expectations and answer questions about what he has seen so far

Manager advises Bobby on what the whole onboarding plan look like and that there will be weekly formal check-in for the first 4 weeks

Day 2

Bobby returns on day 2 with a quick welcome and Q&A session

Bobby shadows each of the key positions in the office on for an hour or two each to learn how things really work in the office, while also getting a better idea of how people communicate with each other and with their patients

Bobby shadows another dental assistant in the afternoon

Day 3

Bobby is once again welcomed with Q&A

Bobby starts working with patients and assisting the current training dental assistant and dentists by On-the-Job Training; this allows Bobby to learn the procedures at the office by doing

Day 4 or 5

Bobby is once again welcomed with Q&A

Bobby starts working in their role with someone shadowing and assisting them to ensure standard office practices. This process may continue until the manager/owner is assured that the new hire is ready to work alone.

At the end of the first week

The manager and Bobby sit down and have coaching and feedback conversations on progress and performance.

Q&A

Week 2

The manager and Bobby sit down and have coaching and feedback conversations on progress and performance.

Q&A

Week 3

The manager and Bobby sit down and have coaching and feedback conversations on progress and performance.

Q&A

Week 4

The manager and Bobby sit down and have coaching and feedback conversations on progress and performance.

Q&A

Development planning conversation to discuss where the employee and manager see the new hire over time and what strengths need to be further built upon and what development gaps need to be addressed.

An initial plan is also made for required on-going recurrent training

So what should I do as a business owner, manager, leader etc.?

Make onboarding a priority; create an onboarding plan that can be replicated for new hires and adjusted for employees in different roles. When creating an onboarding plan or process, think about the types of roles you typically fill. Within that context, explore your current company culture and think about the type of culture you would like to have. Try to think about how each part of the plan will connect new hires to your office, your team and your processes and standards. Consider how you want your new hires to treat customers and communicate internally. And remember, onboarding can always be adjusted and improved over time.

Happy Onboarding!


 

Leslie R. MizerakLeslie R. Mizerak has over 25 years of Leadership Development experience. She is known for helping people connect their thoughts about what good leadership is to their actions.

Leslie Mizerak
Coach & Leadership Facilitator
Lead Coach Mentor, LLC
www.LeadCoachMentor.com

 


 

Attitude. Attendance. Awareness.

Donald Murry is a manager at a dental office. He has to deal with a lot of the firing of assistants as well as dentists. This problem of not having the right person is very tough for him. He checks all different platforms for hiring people and has not found one to give him highly qualified good people to work with.

Even having one person who is incapable or unpleasant to work with can ruin the entire staff. He stresses the difficulty of finding the “perfect team.” He really wants to hear other peoples take on this topic, to see if it is just his process or if it’s a normal thing to encounter at a dental office. All that he asks for is a good attitude, attendance and awareness, is that too much to ask?

Read the full article here:
Attitude. Attendance. Awareness.